Our Peninsula in Antarctica

Kvinge Peninsula was, in fact, named after Thor Kvinge who studied ocean currents and the formation of the bottom water in the Weddel Sea.

Our Peninsula in Antarctica

Since its inception in 1930, scientists from the Chr. Michelsen Institute (CMI) have journeyed out of
Norway to the far corners of the Earth. There is even an area in Antarctica named after one of our
scientists. Kvinge Peninsula was, in fact, named after Thor Kvinge who studied ocean currents and the
formation of the bottom water in the Weddel Sea together with colleagues from CMI and the Geophysical
Institute at the University of Bergen. Which instruments could they use, where should they place them,
and how? And not the least: How would they get there? The answer came from the United States and the
National Science Foundation and the U.S. Coast Guard. They put their icebreaker “USCGC Glacier” at the
scientists’ disposal. A crew of 250 men accompanied Thor and Jan Strømme on their voyage with their
newly constructed instrument rigs.

Thor had a peninsula on the
western side of Antarctica  named after him.

That was in 1968. In 1973 they finally brought up some of the rigs and the project was completed.They were successful and so successful that Thor had a peninsula on the
western side of Antarctica – one of the most inaccessible places on Earth – named after him.
But still – it’s our peninsula! And since we embarked upon our voyage of scientific discovery in 1930,
we have made our mark in many other ways as well, albeit not in the form of our own tracts of land, but
rather in terms of technology and knowledge that are applied around the world and even out in space.

Media Coverage:

The story in TV2

wikipedia

The Story told in Annual Report 2007 page 24-25